Why deforestation affects everyone, not just neighboring communities

Here in the Pacific Northwest we’re so accustomed to being surrounded by nature that we take it for granted. We have neatly paved trails with swarms of trees on our right and left, we can drive for miles on end and be surrounded by luscious evergreens and shrubs on either side, or we can go for a hike and see a variety of wildlife before our eyes.

Greenhouse gas emissions increase as fossil fuel companies make larger profits

Whether we like to admit it or not, the burning of fossils has negatively impacted our environment for quite some time now. And although we can do our part in reducing our carbon footprint, alleviating the large-scale effects of global warming lies within the grasps of the U.S. government and fossil fuel companies who follow the guidelines our administration sets.

Currently, there is no incentive for companies to use cleaner energy, let alone stricter regulations or laws calling for cleaner practices, allowing corporations to keep reaping the benefits of fossil fuel production.

Autumn 2016 Sustainability Course: Global Warming

Atmospheric Sciences (ATMS) 111 will give students a board overview of the science of global warming. The class is open to all students, and will discuss the causes, evidence, future projections, societal and environmental impacts, and potential solutions to global warming. Students will also study the debate on global warming with a focus on scientific issues.

UW students discuss ways of minimizing our collective carbon footprint

The UW Law, Societies, and Justice (LSJ) program held a panel last week to encourage students to think about ways of alleviating our collective carbon footprint. More than a dozen students gathered in Smith Hall to dive deep into the widely debated topic of climate change.

“Climate change is a reality,” said Trace Chaplin, a doctoral student in the Jackson School of International Studies and one of the panel facilitators. “Not only is it here, it’s going to continue.”

Earth Day presentation: Sustainable Energy Infrastructure

Jessica Kaminsky is an Assistant Professor in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at the University of Washington. A scholar of engineering projects and organizations, she conducts research on infrastructure for developing communities with a particular interest in topics of social sustainability. As part of the UW's Earth Day celebration, she gave a talk on how cultural values impact sustainability. Read the text below:

UW's first Polar Day is March 30

The UW Future of Ice Initiative is hosting the university's first Polar Day, a day of talks by faculty and students who work in the polar regions, with time for questions and discussions. 

The event starts at 9:15 a.m. at the UW Club's Yukon Pacific Room, but attendees are welcome to arrive starting at 8:30 a.m. for coffee and pastries. The first 50 people to arrive will receive a free lunch.

The UW Polar Day Schedule is below:

Share your climate change story

UW's Climate Change video contest is back! The School of Environmental and Forest Sciences wants you to create a short (3 minutes or less) video showing what climate change means to you.

Grab your camera, phone or tablet and show the world how you feel about climate change - your vision, your voice. Are you confused, angry, powerless or scared? Or hopeful and inspired to take action?

Governor and students come together for climate conversation

Gov. Jay Inslee joined students at the University of Washington - and several other campuses around the state via videoconference - for a conversation on climate change this week.

The event, which allowed students to pose questions to the governor, was hosted by the College of the Environment and Dean Lisa Graumlich. Inslee had recently returned from the COP21 Climate Change talks in Paris, which led to an international agreement to combat climate change.