Photos may be the key to saving the endangered Galapagos penguins

Photo courtesy of the Center for Penguins as Ocean Sentinels

A tourist, a camera and a good eye may just be the trick to saving the endangered Galapagos penguins.

Tourists and the photographs they take can provide valuable information about the health of the Galapagos penguins and their surrounding environment. From a single shot, UW researchers can determine whether a penguin is breeding, molting or migrating, as well as the bird's age, health status and other information.

EcoReps Program Revision

We here at EcoReps hope that your first couple weeks of school have been going excellently! For those of you who have not yet heard, let us give you a little update about where we are right now. This summer we have been hard at work, overhauling our program to change our focus to project development with the aim of making the UW campus more sustainable.

Meet the EcoReps: Alex Huff

Today we continue our “Meet the Ecoreps” segment with our Marketing and Outreach Coordinator, Alex Huff! Alex is from Woodinville, WA and is a Senior in the Program on the Environment here at UW. He is also a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity where he holds the position of philanthropy chair. In his free time Alex enjoys playing music and exploring the vast world around him.

UW group encourages restoration projects on campus

You may not have noticed, but as you walk around the UW campus more of those plants and flowers at your feet are species native to Puget Sound.

That’s because UW’s Society for Ecology Restoration student guild (SER-UW) native plant nursery has been working to restore areas on campus by increasing native species biodiversity and creating open spaces for students to engage with the natural world just steps from their residence halls.