UW helps protect $30 million to $40 million in U.S. wood exports to Japan

February 14, 2014

By showing the economic benefit to Japanese saw mills, a University of Washington researcher has helped protect U.S. exports of Douglas-fir logs and lumber worth $30 million to $40 million a year.

By showing the economic benefit to Japanese saw mills, a University of Washington researcher has helped protect U.S. exports of Douglas-fir logs and lumber worth $30 million to $40 million a year.

Embarking on geoengineering, then stopping, would speed up global warming

February 18, 2014

Spraying reflective particles into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight and then stopping it could exacerbate the problem of climate change, according to new research by atmospheric scientists at the University of Washington.

Carrying out geoengineering for several decades and then stopping would cause warming at a rate that will greatly exceed that expected due to global warming, according to a study published Feb. 18 in Environmental Research Letters.

Short Takes on Dam(n) Science

February 12, 2014

7 p.m., Feb.18 | Neptune Theater
Ten experts on the natural world will each have 20 slides and less than six minutes to tell us what they’re learning about the biggest dam removal/ecological restoration project on the planet — the removal of two dams on the Elwha River in the Olympic National Forest. The evening, presented by the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, will feature guest host Ranae Holland, the skeptical scientist on Animal Planet’s “Finding Bigfoot” series and a fisheries biologist who has researched the Elwha River.

 

Jewell Visits Mount Rainier, Discusses Climate Change At UW Roundtable

February 5, 2014

"The best classrooms are the ones without walls," said U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, standing inside a classroom at the University of Washington, her alma mater, on Tuesday.

The former CEO of Seattle-based REI spent two days at home this week, wrapping up her visit with a roundtable discussion about the president's Climate Action Plan and the local impacts of climate change.

To illustrate the need to reduce carbon pollution, Jewell visited Mount Rainier National Park and toured areas affected by climate change.

Greenland’s fastest glacier sets new speed record

February 3, 2014

The latest observations of Jakobshavn Glacier show that Greenland’s largest glacier is moving ice from land into the ocean at a speed that appears to be the fastest ever recorded.  Researchers from the University of Washington and the German Space Agency measured the speed of the glacier in 2012 and 2013. The results were published Feb. 3 in The Cryosphere, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union.

Deaths attributed directly to climate change cast pall over penguins

January 29, 2014

Climate change is killing penguin chicks from the world’s largest colony of Magellanic penguins, not just indirectly – by depriving them of food, as has been repeatedly documented for these and other seabirds – but directly as a result of drenching rainstorms and, at other times, heat, according to new findings from the University of Washington.

DNA detectives able to ‘count’ thousands of fish using as little as a glass of water

January 15, 2014

A mere glass full of water from Monterey Bay Aquarium’s 1.2 million-gallon Open Sea tank, among the 10 largest aquariums in the world, is all scientists really needed to identify the Pacific Bluefin tuna, dolphinfish and most of the other 13,000 fish swimming there.

Researchers also for the first time used DNA from water samples to discern which of the species were most plentiful in the tank.

Glaciers, streamflow changes are focus of new Columbia River study

January 15, 2014

The Columbia River is perhaps the most intricate, complex river system in North America. Its diverse landscape crosses international borders and runs through subarctic, desert and sea-level ecosystems. Surrounding communities rely on the river for fishing, agriculture, transportation and electrical power.

As the Earth warms, experts know the Columbia will change – they just don’t know how much or when.

Big is not bad: Scientists call for preservation of large carnivores

January 9, 2014

The world is losing its large carnivores, their ranges are collapsing and many species are at risk of extinction.

“Promoting tolerance and coexistence with large carnivores is a crucial societal challenge that will ultimately determine the fate of Earth’s largest carnivores and all that depends upon them, including humans,” write the co-authors of a review article, in the Jan. 10 issue of Science, about the largest carnivore species on Earth.