Throwing In The Paper Towel Again

November 19, 2010

After Students Expressing Environmental Dedication (SEED) distributed hand towels to residents on Lander Hall’s eighth floor in a pilot program to reduce waste last year, the organization is gearing up for another test run.

Despite lackluster survey response totals tyring to gauge participation, SEED is planning to pass out hand towels to residents of the north tower of Haggett during winter quarter to reach additional students and gather more student response data.

Memo to All Staff: Dump Your Trash

November 1, 2010

To save money, offices around the U.S. are adding a new chore to their employees' routine: taking out the trash.

Some University of Washington workers began emptying their own baskets in a similar program a decade ago as part of an environmental initiative. But with budgets cut 25% over the past two years, Gene Woodard, the school's director of building services, is expanding the program campus-wide.

 

Sticking it out

October 22, 2010

About a dozen students from the UW’s Earth Club came together yesterday afternoon to wage a war against the more than 2,600 paper-towel dispensers on campus by placing a sticker on every single one.

Earth Club president, Vincent Gonzalez, has been working with faculty and building services to reduce on-campus paper-towel usage and decrease the nearly $180,000 that the campus spent on paper towels in the last academic year.

Don't Students Deserve To Compost?

October 25, 2010

It seems like HFS has set out to prove to residents that composting food and service items from their rooms is a privilege, not a right. And I thought the UW was committed to sustainability.

Composting is one of the ways that the UW stands out as “green,” in the color’s purest hue. Michael Meyering, HFS manager for Project and Sustainability, said that about 600 tons of waste was composted last school year.

This year, HFS has discontinued keeping compost bins on every floor of Terry, Lander and Haggett Halls in favor of having one bin per residence hall.

Where Are The Bins?

October 19, 2010

Students returning to some residence halls this year may have noticed that there is no longer a compost bin on their floor. Last year, HFS placed compost bins on every floor of Terry, Lander and Haggett halls. But this year, after looking at costs, HFS has ended the one-bin-per-floor system. Each residence-hall building now has one compost bin, bringing composting to some halls for the first time.

UW Announces New Recycling Initiatives

August 31, 2010

The University of Washington announced new recycling and garbage diversion initiatives for the 2010-2011 academic year today. A new in-game promotion called the Green Minute will be unveiled at Husky Stadium, where ushers and stadium management will assist fans in recycling and composting. Additionally, UW has announced a goal of increasing the amount of all waste diverted at football games in Husky Stadium by 10 percent during the 2010 season.

Eco-friendliness is a part of life at UW

May 5, 2010

Although Earth Day 2010 is now a distant memory, there is still cause to celebrate environmental responsibility on campus as the The Princeton Review’s Green Honor Roll awarded the UW a Green Rating of 99, the highest possible score.
 
Earlier this school year, SIERRA Magazine ranked the UW No. 2 on its top-20 “Coolest Schools.” Universities were ranked based on efforts to curb global climate change and reduce waste.
 

Staying Green

April 22, 2010

Forty years ago 1970, a group of UW students collected garbage from home and on campus and brought it to the front of the HUB. There, they separated the trash into several categories — glass, metal, paper and plastic — and returned them to the original producers for reprocessing. Called a Trash-In, these students helped establish UW’s first recycling program.

Staying Green

April 22, 2010

Forty years ago 1970, a group of UW students collected garbage from home and on campus and brought it to the front of the HUB. There, they separated the trash into several categories — glass, metal, paper and plastic — and returned them to the original producers for reprocessing. Called a Trash-In, these students helped establish UW’s first recycling program.