News Source: 
Mother Nature Network
Fishermen often find themselves at the mercy of conditions that exist well outside of their control
October 28, 2013

Fishermen often find themselves at the mercy of conditions that exist well outside of their control: extreme weather, temperature, breeding cycles, fuel prices, dock prices for their catch and so much more. But what if some of those conditions could be predicted not just days but months into the future? Would the fishing industry be better able to adapt?

That's one of the goals behind an interesting experiment at the University of Washington, where the Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean has developed a new system called the JISAO Seasonal Coastal Ocean Prediction of the Ecosystem or J-SCOPE. The system — currently a prototype — looks at global climate models to anticipate commercial fishing conditions up to six months in the future. J-SCOPE currently looks at five things: chlorophyll levels, sea surface temperatures, sardine populations, oceanic oxygen levels and the California current.

"We're taking the global climate model simulations and applying them to our coastal waters," Nick Bond, a UW research meteorologist, said in a press release. "What's cutting edge is how the tool connects the ocean chemistry and biology."

The prototype system made its first prediction this past January when it warned that the sea waters off the coast of Washington state would experience a period of reduced oxygen (a condition called hypoxia). That prediction came true this past July, and the J-SCOPE system predicts the low-oxygen period will continue through the rest of this year.